University

 

The University of Texas at Austin

Welcome from the President

Welcome to The University of Texas at Austin. Founded in 1883, UT is one of the largest and most respected universities in the nation. Ours is a diverse learning community, with students from every state and more than 100 countries. We're a university with world talent and Texas traditions. Discover more about us online and come visit our beautiful campus in person.

What Starts Here Changes The World

Connecting the values and mission of the university to the needs of the state and the nation. Find out how the university changes the world through research and education.

Campus Profile

The University of Texas at Austin is one of the largest public universities in the United States and is the largest institution of The University of Texas System .

Founded in 1883, the university has grown from a single building, eight teachers, two departments and 221 students to a 350-acre main campus with 17 colleges and schools, about 24,000 faculty and staff, and more than 50,000 students.

The university's reach goes far beyond the borders of the main campus with satellite campuses and research centers across Texas, including the J.J. Pickle Research Campus, the Marine Science Institute , the McDonald Observatory , the Montopolis Research Center and the Brackenridge tract.

With an enrollment of 11,000 students and more than 3,500 master's and doctor's degrees awarded annually, the Graduate School is a national leader in graduate degrees awarded and one of the largest graduate schools in the nation. More than 8,700 bachelor's degrees are awarded annually in more than 170 fields of study and 100 majors.

The university has one of the most diverse student populations in the country and is a national leader in the number of undergraduate degrees awarded to minority students.

What Starts Here Changes the World

We connect the values and mission of the university to the needs of the state and the nation. Find out how the students, faculty and staff of the university change the world through research and education.

The University of Texas at Austin is dedicated to improving the quality of life of the people of Texas and the United States. We are a leading provider of education and research with a depth and diversity of resources unmatched by most other public universities.

As an enduring symbol of the spirit of Texas — big, ambitious and bold — the university drives economic and social progress in Texas and serves our nation as a leading center of knowledge and creativity.

Mission and Core Purpose

From teaching and research to public service, the university's activities support its mission and core purpose :

to transform lives for the benefit of society through the core values of learning , discovery , freedom , leadership , individual opportunity and responsibility .

Read a welcome message from President William Powers Jr. and visit the Office of the President Web site.

The Compact with Texans states that the mission of The University of Texas at Austin is to achieve excellence in the interrelated areas of undergraduate education, graduate education, research and public service.

Read The University of Texas at Austin's 2010-11 Compact with The University of Texas System (PDF).

Commission of 125

In 2002 a group of citizens convened to express a vision of how the university can best serve Texas and society during the next 25 years. After nearly two years of deliberations, the Commission of 125 recommended one imperative: "The University of Texas at Austin must create a disciplined culture of excellence that will enable it to realize its constitutional mandate."

The imperative alludes to the Constitution of the State of Texas, which states, "The Legislature shall...establish, organize and provide for the maintenance, support and direction of a university of the first class." To that end, the commission recommended two strategic initiatives — to develop a new undergraduate core curriculum and to establish a more demanding standard for leadership of academic departments and research centers.

Visiting Campus

How to Get to the Main Campus

The University of Texas at Austin is in the heart of the city of Austin, just north of the downtown area. Campus is just two miles from the State Capitol. Main thoroughfares around campus include Guadalupe Street to the west, Martin Luther King (MLK) Jr. Boulevard to the south, Red River Street to the east and Dean Keeton Street (26th Street) to the north. Check out the main campus maps and the accessibility maps .

IH-35
Take MLK Boulevard exit heading west for south campus; campus will be on your right. Or take the Dean Keeton/26th Street exit heading west for north campus; campus will be on your left.

MoPac/Highway 1
Take Windsor Road exit heading east. Turns into 24th Street, which dead-ends into Guadalupe Street, the western border of campus.

Highway 71
From the east, take I-35 North and follow directions for I-35 above. From the west, take MoPac/Highway 1 North and follow directions for MoPac/Highway 1 above.

I-290
From the east, take I-35 South and follow directions for I-35 above. From the west, follow directions for Highway 71 above.

I-183
From the north, take MoPac/Highway 1 South and follow directions for MoPac/Highway 1 above.

From the south, take Highway 111/Airport Boulevard North to MLK Boulevard. Head east on MLK Boulevard and campus will be on your right.

By plane
Austin-Bergstrom International Airport
The airport is in southeast Austin on Texas Hwy. 71, eight miles from downtown. To reach campus, head west on Hwy 71, take I-35 North and follow directions for I-35 above.

By bus
Capital Metro

Greyhound Bus Lines
Austin Ticket Center
916 E. Koenig Lane
Austin, TX 78751

By train
Amtrak—Texas Eagle
Austin Station
250 N. Lamar Blvd.
Austin, TX 78703

When You Arrive on Campus

Parking

With the sheer size of The University of Texas at Austin campus and the number of people and cars that make it a city within a city, parking on or near campus can sometimes pose a challenge. Give yourself ample time for parking. Learn more about options for visitor parking and review the visitor parking map .

Visitor Center

Once you get to the Forty Acres, stop by the Visitor Center , an excellent starting point for many campus visitors. The center provides organized tours, information sessions and other services to help make campus visits memorable.

The Visitor Center is on the 2nd floor of Walter Webb Hall on the northwest corner of Guadalupe and 25th streets.

Students and families interested in freshman or transfer admission should plan to coordinate their visits through the Undergraduate Admissions Center .

Navigating Campus

There are so many wonderful sights at The University of Texas at Austin that it can be fun to lose yourself on campus, but if you prefer to know exactly where you're headed, check out the main campus maps and the accessibility maps .

Need Help?

Visitor Center
Walter Webb Hall, 2nd floor
512-471-1000

Directory Assistance
512-471-3434

Texas Union Information Center
Main Lobby
512-475-6636

General Information Desk
Rotunda of the Main Building
512-475-7348

More Resources

The new hotel and conference center at The University of Texas at Austin is the AT&T Executive Education and Conference Center . Stop in and stay awhile.

If you love architecture, then you'll be interested in learning about the Campus Master Plan , which aims to preserve the university's traditional public spaces while making sure that campus serves the growing needs of new generations.

If you know anything about Texans, then you know how much we pay attention to the weather. To make sure you're prepared to stay cool during a gloriously hot summer or comfy on a cool, breezy evening, visit Austin Weather .

Campus Tours

Walking Tours

Especially For...

Prospective freshman and transfer students: Campus Visits and Residence Hall Tours

Prospective graduate and international students, non-college bound groups and individuals: Visitor Center

Can't make it to campus for a scheduled visit? Try the self-guided walking tour (PDF) and the self-guided diversity tour (PDF). Download Adobe Reader .

Other Guided

Moonlight Prowl
A guided, nighttime campus tour packed with anecdotes of student life, history and all sorts of university lore. This site also contains a fun UT Trivia quiz and a memory bank where people can share their memories of the university.

Tower Observation Deck Tours
Take a special guided tour around the observation deck of the university's landmark Tower and explore the architecture, interior and more.

Explore UT: The Biggest Open House in Texas!
Explore UT is an annual event for the people of Texas to discover the treasures throughout the campus. Through tours, lectures, performances, demonstrations and other activities, explorers of all ages are invited to make themselves at home, discover something new and have a lot of fun.

Self-Guided

Landmarks
Landmarks brings the finest works of public art to the main campus in order to support the university as a leading research institution, enhance its aesthetic character and provide a source of civic pride and welfare.

Walking the Forty Acres: Building Stones Precambrian to Pleistocene
By S.P. Ellison and Joseph J. Jones.

Walking the Forty Acres: Waller Creek Wilderness Trails and Adjuncts
By S.P. Ellison, Joseph J. Jones and Keith Young.

Virtual Tours

Scenes from the Top

Take a virtual guided tour around the observation deck of the university's Tower.

Life in Austin

Living at The University of Texas at Austin goes hand-in-hand with exploring the city of Austin. Read about what life in Austin offers Longhorns.

Rankings & Kudos

What starts here changes the world.

The University of Texas at Austin makes the world a better place by leveraging its research and knowledge to address the needs of the state, the nation and the world. This list of some of our recent rankings and kudos highlights the university's depth of resources, talent and technology, as well as how the city of Austin—as a national creative center—and the university complement one another.

If you've run across a ranking or other expression of kudos that might fit with this list, send the information to the university's Office of Public Affairs . _

T he University of Texas at Austin's schools of Business, Engineering and Law and its College of Education each rank among the nation's top graduate programs in this year's U.S. News & World Report magazine survey.

Using quantitative and qualitative measures, the magazine annually ranks graduate school programs in business, education, engineering and law. Certain other Ph.D. programs and specialty programs are ranked in alternate years based on ratings of academic experts, including faculty and administrators. All fields are not surveyed every year by U.S. News & World Report.

The university's programs in accounting, archives and preservation, Latin American history and petroleum engineering rank No. 1 in reputational surveys. Several Ph.D. and graduate programs were ranked among the nation's top five in the magazine's reputational survey.

The University of Texas at Austin's graduate school rankings , based on quantitative and qualitative measures:

  • Business — 18th.
  • Education — 10th, tied with University of Pennsylvania.
  • Engineering — 11th, tied with University of California, San Diego.
  • Law — 16th, tied with University of California at Los Angeles. (The School of Law also ranked 14th, tied with the University of Nevada-Las Vegas and Yale University, among the most diverse law schools listed by U.S. News & World Report.)

The University of Texas at Austin's LBJ School of Public Affairs, and programs in the School of Information, School of Nursing, College of Pharmacy and School of Social Work were ranked among leading public affairs graduate programs using solely qualitative measures:

  • Library and Information Studies (ranked in 2005) – 7th, tied with Indiana University and University of Pittsburgh
  • Nursing (master's, ranked in 2007) – 19th, tied with Columbia University, Rush University, University of Virginia, University of Wisconsin and University of Texas Health Science Center-Houston and Vanderbilt University
  • Pharmacy (Pharm. D.) – 4th
  • Public Affairs — 14th, tied with American University, Columbia University, Georgetown University, George Washington University, SUNY-Albany, University of California at Los Angeles, University of Minnesota, University of North Carolina, University of Washington and University of Wisconsin.
  • Social Work (master's) – 6th, tied with University of California at Berkeley

Rankings of The University of Texas at Austin's graduate programs and fields of study (some from previous years), based on opinions of deans, department heads and other senior faculty:

  • Business (ranked in 2008)
    • accounting — 1st
    • entrepreneurship — 9th
    • information systems — 3rd
    • marketing — 9th
  • Education (ranked in 2008)
    • administration/supervision — 6th
    • special education — 4th
  • Engineering (ranked in 2008)
    • aerospace — 8th
    • chemical — 8th
    • civil — 4th
    • computer engineering — 9th
    • environmental/environmental health — 4th
    • mechanical — 10th
    • petroleum — 1st
  • Fine Arts, Master of Fine Arts in art and design (ranked in 2008)— 15th
  • Health Disciplines
    • audiology (ranked in 2008) — 9th
    • clinical psychology (ranked in 2008) — 16th
    • speech-language pathology (ranked in 2008) — 9th
  • Law (ranked in 2008)
    • tax law — 10th
    • trial advocacy – 9th
  • Library and Information Studies
    • archives and preservation (ranked in 2005) — 1st
    • law librarianship (ranked in 2005) — 3rd
  • Public Affairs (ranked in 2008)
    • information and technology management – 9th
    • public policy analysis — 10th
    • social policy — 9th
  • The Sciences :
    • biological sciences (ranked in 2007) — 23rd
    • ecology/evolutionary biology (ranked in 2007) — 8th
    • chemistry (ranked in 2007) — 12th
    • analytical chemistry (ranked in 2007) — 5th
    • computer science (ranked in 2008)— 9th
    • computer science systems (ranked in 2008) — 8th
    • computer science theory (ranked in 2008) – 10th
    • artificial intelligence (ranked in 2008) — 5th
    • programming language (ranked in 2008) – 8th
    • Earth sciences (ranked in 2006) — 9th
    • geology (ranked in 2006) — 5th
    • geophysics and seismology (ranked in 2006) — 8th
    • paleontology (ranked in 2006) — 9th
    • mathematics (ranked in 2008) — 14th
    • analysis (ranked in 2008) – 10th
    • applied math (ranked in 2008) —9th
    • topology (ranked in 2008) — 7th
    • physics (ranked in 2008) — 16th
    • cosmology/relativity/gravity (ranked in 2008) — 8th
    • plasma (ranked in 2008) — 5th
  • Social Sciences and Humanities (ranked in 2005)
    • economics — 25th
    • educational psychology — 77th
    • English — 19th
    • history — 19th
    • Latin American history — 1st
    • political science — 25th
    • psychology — 12th
    • sociology — 14th
    • sociology of population — 5th

T he University of Texas at Austin ranks sixth in the nation in producing undergraduate degrees for minority groups , according to the May 31, 2007 edition of Diverse Issues in Higher Education magazine.

In addition to the overall standing, the university ranks 10th nationally among the magazine's Top 100 producers of undergraduates for Hispanics, eighth for Asian Americans and 59th for American Indians.

Among undergraduate academic programs in the top 100 at the university:

  • Engineering ranks fourth overall, fifth for Hispanics, fourth for Asian Americans, 22nd for American Indians and 37th for African Americans.
  • Mathematics ranks third overall, third for Hispanics, fourth for Asian Americans and sixth for African Americans.
  • Biological and biomedical sciences ranks sixth overall, fourth for Hispanics and sixth for Asian Americans and 50th for African Americans.
  • Social sciences ranks 10th overall, seventh for Hispanics and 12th for Asian Americans.
  • Area ethnic, cultural and gender studies ranks 15th overall, seventh for Hispanics and 12th for Asian Americans.
  • Computer and information science and support services rank 13th overall, sixth for Asian Americans and 37th for Hispanics.
  • English ranks 22nd overall, 11th for Hispanics and 13th for Asian Americans.
  • Business, management, marketing and related support services rank 29th overall, 13th for Asian Americans and and 32nd for Native Americans.
  • Psychology ranks 22nd overall, 27th for Hispanics and 15th for Asian Americans.

Last year, the university ranked fifth overall, seventh for Hispanics, ninth for Asian Americans and 65th for American Indians.

The report— Top 100 Undergraduate Degree Producers —includes degrees conferred during the 2005-06 academic year that have been reported to the U.S. Department of Education's National Center for Education Statistics through the Completions Survey of the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data Set.

KINGDOM COLLEGE OF NATURAL HEALTH INC

Premier Educator of Leaders in Natural Health

The Natural Health field is growing at a phenomenal rate throughout the world. And millions of Americans — aware of the detrimental effects of drug-based western medicine — are joining health oriented people around the globe in embracing an alternative natural approach . Encompassing the core building blocks of all living organisms, an holistic lifestyle promotes the building, repair, and maintenance of health.

HOLISTIC APPROACH - Offering information to those seeking knowledge and providing real answers on how to return to the principles of natural health, Kingdom College of Natural Health (KCNH) offers degrees in Naturopathy, Homeopathy , Public Health , Herbal Medicine , Complementary Medicine , Nutrition , and Naturopathic Psychology. In addition, its degree program in Natural Medicine for Animals is unique in the industry. With its wide range of programs and experienced faculty , Kingdom College of Natural Health is the choice of serious-minded individuals seeking solutions to the current health-care crisis.

NATURAL HEALTH EDUCATOR—Since 1993, Kingdom College of Natural Health has been an innovator in natural health education. Our curriculum is somewhat more intense than other contemporary educational institutions offering similar programs. However, the knowledge gained at KCNH provides students a solid foundation from which to confidently engage in any aspect of holistic health care within their particular area of study. For this reason, we typically attract professionals seeking to further their knowledge in natural health modalities.

Kingdom College of Natural Health has been recognized throughout the world as a premier Distance & Online Learning educator since 1993. All faculty members are practitioners of the healing arts, adept in mentoring and guiding students to a successful career. Our faculty is world-class, and our staff is trained to answer questions pertaining to every aspect of enrollment. Whether you are new to the principles of holistic health, a keen amateur, or a seasoned professional, Kingdom College of Natural Health provides a cultivated avenue to the world of knowledge you seek!

Thinking about your future…?

There's no time like now to begin your career.

Join our graduates, and make a difference in peoples' lives!

CONTACT US TODAY at 1.800.803.2988.

Or email us at info@kcnh.org This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

ONLINE APPLICATION

VIEW CATALOGUE

Kingdom College of Natural Health offers degrees in Naturopathy, Homeopathy , Public Health , Herbal Medicine , Complementary Medicine , Nutrition , and Naturopathic Psychology. In addition, its degree program in Natural Medicine for Animals is unique in the industry.

Degree Programs

We offer a wide variety of degree programs. Please follow the program links below to find out more about each program including course titles and credit hours.

Description Of Degree Programs

HUMAN NATURAL HEALTH
Bachelors Degree Programs
Masters Degree Programs
Doctorate Degree Programs
Professional Programs
ANIMAL NATURAL HEALTH
School Of Natural Animal Health

 

Stephen F. Austin

State University

Majors and areas of study offered at SFA

Info for Future Students
Info for Parents
Info for Counselors

Campus Safety

Campus Resources

Communication Methods

In the event of an emergency, there are four primary ways information will be communicated to the campus community related to the situation:

Outdoor Alert System

To promptly alert the campus in case of an imminent threat, SFA installed an outdoor alert system in November 2007.

Sirens for the centrally located outdoor alert system are installed on the roof of the Ralph W. Steen Library to ensure the alert sound may be heard across the main university campus.

While the alert system may be heard inside some buildings on campus, the system is designed to provide an audible alert outdoors.

When will the system be sounded?
The alert system will be sounded when there is an imminent threat to SFA students, faculty, staff and visitors. This may include:

  • Severe weather, such as a tornado, that is on a direct path toward the campus
  • The unlikely situation of an active danger, such as an armed individual on campus


What alert sound does the siren make?
To listen to a sample of what you can expect to hear if the outdoor alert system is activated, make sure that sound is enabled on your computer and click:

  • Weather alert tone:
  • Active danger alert tone:

When will the system be sounded?
The alert system will be sounded when there is an imminent threat to SFA students, faculty, staff and visitors. This may include:

  • Severe weather, such as a tornado, that is on a direct path toward the campus
  • The unlikely situation of an active danger, such as an armed individual on campus


What do I do if the siren sounds?
If you hear a weather alert tone:

  • Immediately seek shelter inside the nearest building.
  • Move to the interior of the building on the lowest floor away from exterior windows and doors.
  • Remain there until you receive an all-clear communication.

If you hear an active danger alert tone:
Situations of this type are unique and develop quickly. It is impossible to prescribe a course of action that will be appropriate for every potential incident. The best advice in the event of this type of warning is to:

  • Immediately heighten your awareness of your surroundings and use common sense.
  • If it is obvious that the situation is occurring outdoors, immediately seek shelter inside the nearest building. If the location of the developing situation is obviously indoors and you can leave campus without endangering yourself, do so immediately.
  • When indoors, secure yourself behind a locked door, if possible, in the interior of the building away from exterior windows and doors.
  • Remain there until you receive an all-clear communication.
  • Updates will be posted on the SFA website at www.sfasu.edu as soon as possible.

Monthly testing
The alert siren will be activated the first Wednesday of each month at approximately 11:55 a.m. to test the system. Both the weather alert and active danger alert sounds will be sounded during the test. The alert sounds will be preceded by a spoken message announcing that a test of the system is about to occur. Should threatening weather be near the campus at that time, campus safety officials may choose to cancel the test to avoid any possible confusion regarding weather conditions.

If you hear the monthly system test notice and tones :

  • No action is necessary.
  • Notices of the test will be sent to all campus e-mails and will be posted on the SFA website.

If you have other questions regarding the outdoor alert system, contact University Police at 468-2608.

Website Alert System

When a Campus Alert is issued a bright yellow banner is splashed across the top of every webpage hosted on the SFA website. You can click on this banner to access the Campus Alerts webpage. This webpage will be updated as information becomes available related to the alert. You have probably already seen the Campus Alert banners on the website as these are tested monthly when they are used to remind the campus community of the monthly outdoor siren system.

Mobile Alert System

This system is available to students, faculty and staff who register a mobile device, such as a cell phone. Land-line phones and e-mail addresses different from your campus e-mail address may also be registered. When an alert is issued, messages are sent to all of the devices you have registered on this system.

Remember, this system requires your registration.

Go to mySFA and click on the red “Register to Get Campus Alerts” button to start.

E-Mail Alert System

During a campus alert, a group e-mail will be sent to every student, faculty and staff member. This e-mail will direct individuals to the SFA website for additional information.

Timely Warning Procedures

The Stephen F. Austin State University Police Department (SFASU PD) is the department within the University that is responsible for issuing timely campus alerts in compliance with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act {20 U.S.C. 1092(f)}.

When a determination is made that an alert should be issued, the SFASU PD will inform the campus community by utilizing a number of communication methods. Appropriate steps will be taken to ensure that a timely warning is issued.

The determination of when an alert will be issued will be made on a case-by-case basis and will consider the facts surrounding the incident; including such factors as the nature of the incident, the imminent or continuing threat to the University community. Weather alerts may be issued when there is an imminent threat to the safety of the campus community from severe weather.

The SFASU PD will coordinate with the appropriate University departments and officials to ensure that local media outlets are notified of any alert issued.

Emergency Procedures


Note on Contacting University Police
If you dial "911" from any campus phone you will be connected to University Police. If you dial "911" from a cell phone, a pay phone, or some other non-campus phone you will be connected to the Nacogdoches Police and then transferred to UPD.

For the fastest response when using a campus phone - dial 911
For the fastest response when using any non-campus phone - dial 468-2608

FIRE

LEARN THE LOCATION OF FIRE EXTINGUISHERS, EXITS, AND MANUAL PULL STATIONS IN YOUR AREA AND HOW TO USE THEM.

PROCEDURE IF A FIRE OCCURS

  1. If an emergency exists, activate the manual pull station building alarm system. IMMEDIATELY contact UPD at 911 from a campus phone or 468-2608 from a cell phone.
  2. If a minor fire appears controllable, promptly direct the charge of the fire extinguisher toward the base of the flame, only if you can do so safely.
  3. Evacuate when prompted by continuous sounding fire alarms or by an official announcement.
  4. Be aware of and make use of designated primary and alternate evacuation routes.
  5. Leave the building in an orderly manner without rushing or crowding—DO NOT USE THE ELEVATOR DURING A FIRE.
  6. Provide aid to those who need it in an emergency evacuation situation.
  7. Smoke is the greatest danger in a fire, so stay near the floor where air will be less toxic.
  8. Once outside,
    • Always evacuate crosswind and/or upwind away from any fire emergency by a safe route.
    • Evacuate to at least 300 feet from the building and out of the way of emergency vehicles.
  9. Report any individuals who have been injured or left behind to emergency responders.
  10. If requested, assist emergency crews.
  11. DO NOT RETURN TO AN EVACUATED BUILDING until an all-clear is officially announced.

NOTE: Should you become trapped inside a building during a fire and a window is available, place an article of clothing (shirt, coat, etc.) outside the window as a marker for rescue crews. If there is no window, stay near the floor where the air will be less toxic. Shout at regular intervals to alert emergency crews of your location. DO NOT PANIC!

IMPORTANT: After an evacuation, report to your department head to let them know your status.

WEATHER

PROCEDURE WHEN A SEVERE WEATHER OR TORNADO WARNING IS ISSUED

Seek shelter immediately in designated areas.

  1. If inside a building:
    1. Go to the lowest level of the building, if possible.
    2. Stay away from windows.
    3. Go to an interior hallway.
    4. Use arms to protect head and neck in a “drop and tuck” position.
    5. Avoid the most dangerous locations of a building, usually along south and west sides and at corners.
  2. If there is no time to get inside:
    1. Lie in a ditch or low-lying area or crouch near a strong building.
    2. Be aware of potential for flooding.
    3. Use arms to protect head and neck in a “drop and tuck” position.
    4. Use jacket, cap, backpack or any similar items, if available, to protect face and eyes.

EVACUATION

In most cases, an evacuation would apply only to the buildings that are immediately affected. In some cases, such as local terrorism, flooding or earthquake, the evacuation could apply to the entire campus. Some of the events that might call for an evacuation could also require sheltering-in-place based on your proximity to the event. You should heed official requests and use common sense when you can not receive an official announcement.

Some events that might prompt an evacuation are:

  • Major Fire or Explosion
  • Hazardous Materials Release (also see Shelter-in-Place)
  • Chemical/Biological/Radiological Spill (also see Shelter-in-Place)
  • Flooding
  • Earthquake
  • Structural Failure
  • Bomb Threat
  • Weapons (also see Armed Subjects)

Procedure for Evacuation

  1. Evacuate when prompted by continuous sounding fire alarms or by an official announcement.
  2. Be aware of and make use of designated primary and alternate evacuation routes.
  3. Close classroom or office doors as you leave.
  4. Leave the building in an orderly manner without rushing or crowding—DO NOT USE THE ELEVATOR.
  5. Provide aid to those who need it in an emergency evacuation situation.
  6. Be aware of and follow instructions given by UPD and other officials. You may be asked to proceed on foot to designated areas or
    evacuate the campus entirely.
    • Always evacuate crosswind and/or upwind away from any emergency by a safe route.
    • Evacuate to at least 300 feet from the building and out of the way of emergency vehicles.
  7. Report any individuals who have been injured or left behind to emergency responders .
  8. DO NOT RETURN TO AN EVACUATED BUILDING until an all-clear is officially announced.

SHELTER-IN-PLACE

Sheltering-in-place is the use of any classroom, office or building for the purpose of providing temporary shelter. Since many of the events that would require sheltering-in-place might also require evacuation based on your proximity to the event you should heed official requests and use common sense when you can not receive an official announcement.

Shelter-in-Place : Hazardous Material Release

  1. Receive a shelter-in-place announcement.
  2. Immediately move indoors.
  3. Close all windows and doors to shelter and seal as best you can, using towels, clothes or paper.
  4. If there appears to be air contamination within the shelter, place a paper mask, wet handkerchief or wet paper towel over the nose and mouth for temporary respiratory protection.
  5. Continue to follow the instructions given by the response authorities.

Shelter-in-Place : Terrorist Attack or Armed Intruder

See the Armed Subjects protocol.

ARMED SUBJECTS

If you witness any armed individual on campus at any time, or if an individual is acting in a hostile or belligerent manner, immediately contact UPD at 911 from a campus phone, or 468-2608 from a cell phone.

If the armed subject is outside the building:

  • Turn off all the lights. Close and lock all windows and doors.
  • If you can do so safely, get all students on the floor and out of the line of fire.
  • Move to a core area of the building if safe to do so and remain there until an “all clear” instruction is given by an authorized known voice.
  • If the staff or students do not recognize the voice that is giving instruction, they should not change their status.
  • Unknown or unfamiliar voices may be misleading and designed to give false assurances.

If the armed subject is inside the building:

  • If it is possible to flee the area safely and avoid danger, do so.
  • Contact UPD at 911 from a campus phone, or 468-2608 from a cell phone, with your location if possible.
  • If flight is impossible, lock all doors and secure yourself in your space.
  • Get down on the floor or under a desk and remain silent.
  • Get students on the floor and out of the line of fire.
  • Wait for the “all clear” instruction.

If the armed subject comes into your class or office:

  • There is no one procedure the authorities can recommend in this situation.
  • Attempt to get the word out to other staff if possible, and call UPD at 911 from a campus phone, or 468-2608 from a cell phone, if that seems practical.
  • Use common sense. If hiding or fleeing is impossible attempt to negotiate with the individual.
  • Attempting to overcome the armed subject with force is a last resort that should only be initiated in the most extreme circumstances.
  • Remember, there may be more than one active armed subject.
  • Wait for the “all clear” instruction.
  • Be careful not to make any changes to the scene of the incident since law enforcement authorities will investigate the area later.
  • In case you must flee, get as far away from the shooting scene as possible and then contact authorities.

DISRUPTIVE INDIVIDUALS

If you witness a disruptive individual on campus at any time, immediately contact UPD at 911 from a campus phone, or 468-2608 from a cell phone.

Who is a disruptive individual?

  • An individual who makes threats of physical harm to you, others, or themselves.
  • An individual who has a weapon. ( Refer to armed subjects protocol. )
  • An individual who behaves in a bizarre manner or exhibits unstable behavior patterns.
  • An individual who appears to be intoxicated or under the influence of a controlled substance.

What action should I take?

  • Contact UPD at 911 from a campus phone, or 468-2608 from a cell phone.
  • Give your name and campus location with a brief explanation of the situation.
  • Take note of the individual's age, personal appearance, clothing, vehicle, or any other information that would help identify the individual.

Express your authority with non-verbal cues.

  • Sit or stand erect.
  • Square your shoulders.
  • Smile and make eye contact.
  • Speak clearly and distinctly.
  • Maintain a constant voice volume—not too loud.

Cues to avoid.

  • Do not touch your face.
  • Observe the individuals personal space—do not stand too close.
  • Do not touch the person.
  • Do not slouch, glare, or sigh at the individual.

Anger Management Tactics.

  • Get their attention: Use their name. Ask them to sit down.
  • Acknowledge their feelings: Paraphrase what they say so they will know you are listening.
  • Get them moving: Offer a chair, move them to a private area if possible.
  • Offer assistance: Use the word “we” to include them in the solution process.
  • Tell them exactly what you can do for them and when.
  • Offer an alternative if appropriate.
  • Advise co-workers of the potential problem if possible.
  • Call for aid immediately if you sense the situation is getting out of hand.

Automatic Electronic Defibrillators (AED)

Stephen F. Austin State University currently has more than forty (40) AED devices placed across campus to date. Use of these devices is automated and instructions are provided by the device when it is opened. Demonstrations on how to use these AEDs can be arranged through the Department of Campus Recreation. Call 468-3507 to make arrangements.

Current AED Locations

  • Academic Facilities
    • McGee Business Bldg - Main Lobby 1st Floor
    • Cole Concert Hall - Main Lobby
    • Early Childhood Lab - West Hallway
    • McKibben Education Bldg - Main Lobby 1st Floor
    • Liberal Arts North - Main Hallway 1st Floor
    • Library (1st Floor Lobby)
    • Math/Nursing - Main Lobby 1st Floor
    • Miller Science - Main Lobby 1st Floor
    • Turner Auditorium - Main Lobby
  • Residence Life Facilities
    • Griffith Hall - Main Lobby
    • Hall 10 - Main Lobby
    • Hall 14 - Main Lobby
    • Hall 16 - Main Lobby
    • Kerr Hall - Main Lobby
    • Lodge - Main Lobby
    • Mays Hall - Main Lobby
    • North Hall - Main Lobby
    • South Hall - Main Lobby
    • Steen Hall - Main Lobby
    • Todd Hall - Main Lobby
    • Village Bldg 1 - Center Building Lobby
    • Village Bldg 2 - Center Building Lobby
    • Village Bldg 3 - Center Building Lobby
  • Athletic Facilities
    • Field House (West Entrance-Outside)
    • Press Box (Inside Stairwell)
    • Wellness Center
    • William R. Johnson Coliseum (Front Door)
  • Other Campus Facilities
    • Student Center 1st Floor (Atrium at Food Court Entrance)
    • Student Center 2nd Floor (Grand Ballroom Lobby by Stairwell Entrance)
    • Student Recreation Center Front Desk
    • Student Recreation Center - 1st Floor by the Gym
    • Student Recreation Center - 2nd Floor Track by Racquetball Courts
    • Student Recreation Center - 2nd Floor by Multi-Purpose Studio
    • Student Recreation Center - Lifeguard Office
    • HPE Building Equipment Cage
  • Portable
    • All University Police Patrol Vehicles
    • Campus Recreation for use at Intramural Fields
    Phone numbers

    For general information:

    • off-campus - 936.468.3401
    • on-campus - 468.INFO

    Important numbers:

    • Admissions - 936.468.2504
    • Financial Aid - 936.468.2403
    • Steen Library Administration - 936.468.4101
    • Registrar - 936.468.2501
    • Residence Life - 936.468.2601
    SFASU physical address
    1936 North St.
    Nacogdoches, TX 75962

     

 

 

 

 

 

 


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